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Origin of Butterfly Blue Pea Tea

Origin of Butterfly Blue Pea Tea

28 Nov 18  |  By Denzil Gomes

Despite being loaded with health benefits and natural goodness, blue pea tea or butterfly pea tea as it is also called is known for something else ~ its mesmerising colour changing properties. Yes, you read that right. Just a few drops of lemon can turn this azure blue tea into a deep purple colour. This change occurs when the pH balance of the flowers are altered making it a favourite among mixologists who infuse it with alcohol. These 'mood rings' have become a head turner at social events and cocktail parties.

Butterfly blue pea tea is made from the Clitorea ternatea plant. It has its origins in South East Asia and is commonly enjoyed in countries such as Thailand and Taiwan, where it is mixed with honey and lemon. This particular drink is called ‘Nam dok Anchan’ and is served in spas. Other ingredients such as mint, cinnamon, ginger and passion fruit complement the brew.

Butterfly pea flowers are infused in food to make dishes such as the Malay blue rice dish, Nasi Keruba. The petals of the blue-pea flower are also used to make a blue dye. Butterfly Blue tea has been described as tasting like a fine green tea, which has an earthy, woody flavour.

We have infused blue pea flowers and orange peels in green tea to give you our unique Blue Pea Green Tea. Taste notes are fresh and citrus with a smooth finish. Sip on a cup or whip up a mesmerising cocktail.  Click here to shop this tea.


Denzil Gomes

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